St. Patrick’s Day Lore

By Angela Clark

St.Patrick’s day is right around the corner as we make our way into March. The day is a cultural and religious celebration held on the 17th of March, the traditional death date of Saint Patrick, the patron saint of Ireland. Celebrations of the holiday typically consist of religious services , wearing green, parades, and drinking. Feasting on the day features traditional Irish food, including corned beef, corned cabbage, coffee, soda bread, potatoes, and shepherd’s pie. Many celebrations also hold an Irish breakfast of sausage, black and white pudding, fried eggs, and fried tomatoes. Popular things we see on st.Patrick’s day is lots and lots of green, shamrocks, and homeage to the popular Irish myth of leprechauns via green top hats and buckled shoes.

 

On St. Patrick’s Day Irish people wear a fresh shamrock on their coat lapels, as a sign of honor and respect for our most beloved Saint Patrick. The Shamrock is a type of clover, but the leaves of an Irish shamrock plant are far smaller than a typical American clover.  It grows in bunches, rather than the typical single stem and leaf growth pattern of a clover. Saint Patrick used the shamrock as a symbol to explain the Trinity to unbelievers, explaining that God is like a shamrock, separated into three different parts as the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit but at the same time whole and complete. Shamrocks thrive in Irish fields throughout spring and summer and are attributed with mystical power.  When a storm is approaching shamrocks supposedly point skywards, standing tall as a warning sign and only a shamrock(as the myth goes) can undo the magical spell of a leprechaun.

 

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